Monday, December 28, 2009

Arts advocates push to move SOTA to Civic Center

Inside this bleak gray building, it's voices like these that make the School of the Arts a creative force.

See the story on SF's KGO Channel 7 ....

Thursday, December 17, 2009

In the news: Throwing caution to the wind to benefit schools

It’s been a little too easy for one man to grow a mustache so offensive that his co-workers offered him $2,600 to shave it — even easier, he said, to turn it down because they didn’t like it.

Read more in the SF Examiner ...

In the news: S.F. schools get tougher on credit card use

San Francisco's school superintendent has laid down the law when it comes to the use of district-issued credit cards by school board members, issuing an edict that prohibits spending on personal items and limits gratuities to 15 percent.

Read more in the SF Chronicle ...

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

In the news: Enrollment changes afoot

The Board of Education has set a March deadline for a long-sought change to San Francisco’s controversial public school assignment system so members can focus on other issues.

Read more in the SF Examiner ...

In the news: Chance to drop electronic waste in S.F.

Electronic manufacturer Samsung is inviting people with old electronic devices to safely recycle them for free in San Francisco through a program starting Saturday.

Read more in the SF Chronicle ...

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Put in your two cents on student assignment

The City’s school district has narrowed its list of alternatives to a controversial student assignment admission system and is enabling quite a few opportunities to hear about it this week.

Read more in the SF Examiner ...

Broken heaters chill city classrooms

While the temperatures in San Francisco dipped to being frightful, out-of-service heaters in city schools kept classrooms short of being delightful.

Read more in the SF Examiner ...

Monday, December 14, 2009

In the news: A Tale of Two School Programs

San Francisco school officials want to expand a Montessori program at one of the city's public elementary schools.

Hear the show Forum on KQED FM

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

In the news: Order’s up! Celebrities serve food to benefit schools

A dinner of Dungeness crab in San Francisco is not out of the ordinary. But paying $275 for a plate and being served by financier Warren Hellman or MC Hammer is — even if the money is going to schools.

Read more in the SF Examiner ...

Tuesday, December 8, 2009

SF teachers face deadline for specialty credential

Tuesday, San Francisco's Board of Education may vote to begin firing teachers who are not credentialed to work with kids who are learning English. It is an impending consequence that some teachers are fighting.

See the news here ...

Monday, December 7, 2009

In the news: Teachers will have to get English learner certification

Superintendent Carlos Garcia will propose Tuesday that every teacher in the district have credentials to teach English learners by January 20 or else they could be fired.

Read more in the SF Examiner ...

In the news: Montessori program at S.F. school stirs clash

When San Francisco school officials opened a public Montessori program in an under-enrolled elementary school adjacent to the city's low-income Western Addition neighborhood in 2005, it sounded like a good idea.

Read more in the SF Chronicle ...

Wednesday, December 2, 2009

In the news: High School Students Get Head Start in Financial Field

For nearly 30 years the National Academy Foundation has helped high school students, particularly those from underprivileged neighborhoods, become better versed in financial issues and get scholarships to attend college.

See the news here ...

In the news: Some school secretaries spared from job cuts, for now

Some San Francisco school secretaries, who were first told about impending layoffs last month, have been spared for the time being.

see the news here ...

Tuesday, December 1, 2009

State's students getting a little fitter

More California students cast aside their couch potato ways in 2009 and scored better in annual physical fitness tests than in recent years.

Read more in the SF Chronicle ...

School district receives award for being green

The school district is one of seven organizations receiving a Green California Schools Leadership Award next week for its efforts to green its campuses.

Read more in the SF Examiner

Monday, November 30, 2009

In the news: SFUSD may turn a shade greener

Teachers and administrators in the school district may be forced to shrink their carbon footprint if a new resolution is adopted by the Board of Education early next year.

Read more in the SF Examiner ...

In the news: Increasing police presence on campuses questioned

Boosting police presence at four San Francisco schools has been proposed, but questions about whether that is the best use of state funds has stalled a decision.

Read more in the SF Examiner ...

In the news: Turkey Bowl a San Francisco football tradition

When Jack Scramaglia's extended family was living along 11th Avenue in San Francisco, they knew exactly what to do on Thanksgiving mornings.

Read more in the SF Chronicle ...

In the news: San Francisco's school of last resort

With a convicted bank robber and a former methamphetamine user in charge, John Muir Charter School on Treasure Island is not your typical public school.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2009/11/29/MNRG1A9R7G.DTL#ixzz0YNFyKrRC

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

In the News: SF's troubled budget spills over onto schools

A new report by the city controller says San Francisco's economic outlook is worse than expected. The city's financial problems are spilling over into the schools.

Watch on ABC 7 ...

Monday, November 16, 2009

In the News: Student newspaper runs supremacist ad

The Lowell High School student newspaper published Friday included an advertisement for a white supremacist Web site, reportedly paid for by a group promoting a "campaign to inform, awaken and radicalize our White American youth."

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

In the News: Teaching styles clash at elementary school

The idea of turning an entire elementary school in Lower Pacific Heights into the first public learning facility in San Francisco to incorporate a Montessori education has raised alarms with parents and teachers.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

Monday, November 2, 2009

In the News: S.F. schools hoping voters open wallets

Since 2003, San Francisco’s public school district has received $745 million in voter-approved bond funding for facility upgrades. Now, school board members are considering going back to voters for another $531 million for additional improvements.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

Wednesday, October 28, 2009

In the News: Programs for struggling students face cutbacks

Millions of dollars worth of school programs that serve underprivileged students could be sacrificed due to the district’s looming $30 million deficit.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

Wednesday, October 21, 2009

In the News: S.F. schools' lunch money cut off; rules broken

School lunches have long been the butt of bad jokes featuring mystery meat and plastic-wrapped bean burritos, but in San Francisco, feeding more than 30,000 children every day - while following strict federal rules - is no laughing matter.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

Wednesday, October 14, 2009

In the News: School board votes to keep kids in the classroom

San Francisco's school board got a round of applause Tuesday after voting to make it harder for students to get sent home from school.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

In the News: Special education resources get boost

More and more students are being diagnosed with autism in The City’s school district, and it’s costing more money.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

Thursday, October 8, 2009

In the News: Group brings golf to inner city kids

First Tee of San Francisco wants to get rid of the notion that golf is only for the well-to-do. Wednesday, the organization opened a new golf facility in one of San Francisco's most underserved communities.

Learn more from ABC 7 ...

In the News: Visitacion Valley students get exposed to golf

Sixth-grader Billy Smith could see the fairways at Gleneagles Golf Course from his school across the road, but he never knew anyone who had played there.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

Monday, October 5, 2009

In the News: S.F. schools head uses district credit as her own

As San Francisco schools have cut budgets to the bone, the city's school board president used her district-issued credit card to charge thousands of dollars for personal items and thousands more at city restaurants and cafes, according to a Chronicle analysis of financial records

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

Friday, October 2, 2009

In the News: Bay Area Volunteers Pitch In To Help Tsunami Victims

Students at San Francisco's Thurgood Marshall High School are gathering food, clothing, and money to send to Samoan villages.

Watch video from KTVU 2 ...

Monday, September 28, 2009

In the News: S.F. teacher who 'dated' girl gets 5 years

A former San Francisco middle-school teacher was sentenced Friday to five years in prison for lewd conduct with a girl at the school over two years.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

In the News: West Portal immersion program still thriving

It was 1984 when a handful of San Francisco parents embarked on a controversial education experiment to open the first Chinese immersion public school program in the nation.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

In the News: Truancy crackdown swings to S.F. parents, teens

San Francisco school and city officials will beef up the fight against truancy by expanding intervention and criminal prosecution at the high school level to parents and teenagers, District Attorney Kamala Harris announced Friday.


Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

In the News: Innovative program combats truancy

Watch on ABC 7's View from the Bay.

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

In the News: Police returning to high school sporting events

Uniformed police officers are usually present at public high school football games in The City, but that has not been the case this school year.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

In the News: S.F. schools fall short of federal marks

The City’s public schools are not keeping up with federal mandates established under the federal No Child Left Behind Act, despite the fact that its overall scores on standardized tests have been higher than the state’s for eight years in a row.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

In the News: School test results bring confusion

After six long years being tagged as a failure by federal standards, Malcolm X Academy was recast Tuesday as an unmitigated success story.

Read more in the SF Chronicle ...

In the News: New S.F. high school nurtures immigrant youth

The 50 high school students heading to their next class looked like typical teenagers, hauling backpacks, cradling books and laughing. Yet they were far from it.

Read more in the SF Chronicle ...

Thursday, September 3, 2009

In the News: Slight gains in exit exam results

More high school sophomores passed one or both parts of the California High School Exit Exam this year than 10th graders in previous years, but the failure rate - about 20 percent in each the English and math sections - means about 100,000 students in the class of 2011 still must pass it to graduate.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

In the News: S.F. trails state in number of sophomores passing exit exam

More California sophomores are passing the high school graduation exam, but fewer San Francisco public school 10th-graders are passing the math portion than five years ago. And, there’s only been a slight increase in English pass rates for first-time test takers.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

In the News: Gateway to College program gives dropouts hope

By the time Stacey Jones started her senior year of high school last fall in San Francisco, she'd been to half a dozen schools in half a dozen districts, from Sacramento to San Mateo. She'd floated from relative to relative since her mother was in a serious car crash a few years earlier.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

Thursday, August 27, 2009

In the News: A school blooms again on Haight Street

Just over four years ago, the school board voted to shut down De Avila Elementary - the Haight Street school that wasn't attracting families and had poor test scores - to save money and cope with declining district-wide enrollment.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

In the News: Carver Elementary gives kids warm welcome

On her first day of kindergarten Monday, 4-year-old Malaya Hickman held her mother's hand tightly in the unfamiliar hallways of George Washington Carver Elementary School in San Francisco. Then she saw a family friend across the lobby, and began waving wildly. Then she saw another friend. And another.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

In the News: English learners in S.F. show gains on the SATs

Despite widespread language barriers, San Francisco public high school students showed improvements on the reading portion of the SAT college-entrance exam during the 2008-09 school year — an increase that defied national trends.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

In the News: Teachers receive A for effort

Teachers at James Lick Middle School — which overall rated below the state average on standardized tests this year — will receive $2,000 more a year for the extra work they put in outside the classroom.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

In the News: Parents rescue inner-city Potrero Hill school

Jennifer Betti had a simple wish: She wanted to walk her son to school, and she didn't want to have to move from her Potrero Hill home to a suburb to do it.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

In the News: Art school comes back to San Francisco

For anyone older than their mid-30's, you'll remember dance, theater, and music as a part of your school curriculum. These days, those programs are among the first to be cut, but they are making a comeback in San Francisco.

Watch more at ABC 7 ...

Friday, August 21, 2009

In the news: City's increase in kindergartners leaves less room to learn

When it’s almost commonplace in a classroom for one kindergartner to have a potty accident at the same time another is crying because of a cut finger, the last thing a teacher needs is two additional students to care for.


Read more in SF Examiner.

In the news: JROTC Marches On -- With a Catch

SAN FRANCISCO — Reinventing the wheel isn’t always easy.

A team of San Francisco Unified School District administrators spent their summer figuring out how best to allow students to earn physical education credits for the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps program, after the school board killed the program and then later brought it back to life.



Read more in SF Examiner.

In the news: Teachers Take Alternate Route Into Classroom

Lila Morris was nearly 40 when the real estate market tanked in the late 1990s, leaving her unemployed.

Read more in San Francisco Chronicle.

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

In the News: San Francisco ‘dents’ test score racial gap

It was hailed as a small step in the long journey of closing the achievement gap in San Francisco schools.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

In the News: S.F. schools' scores best of urban districts

Overall, San Francisco schools posted the highest test scores among urban districts in the state, far surpassing even the state average in both math and English, according to results released Tuesday.



Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

In the News: Bay Area Schools Show Improvement In State STAR Testing

Watch coverage from KTVU 2 ...

In the News: See How Bay Area Schools Faired in STAR Tests

California public school students made overall gains in every category of the state's Standardized Testing and Reporting program, but an achievement gap in which black and Hispanic students lag behind other students persists, the state's top education official said.

Read more from NBC 11 ...

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

SFUSD Narrows Achievement Gap

The San Francisco Unified School District improved on the California Standards Test (CST) for the eighth consecutive year in 2009. Two out of three second through seventh grade students are now proficient or advanced in Math. SFUSD remains the highest performing large urban district in California and the district’s average is higher than the state’s average.

Read more ...

In the News: Achievement gap among students stalled

The state's stubborn achievement gap once again failed to budge in 2009 even as more students than ever finished the school year at or above grade level in standardized testing, according to results released today.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

In the News: State releases school S.F. test scores

Despite years of trying to raise the test scores of black and Hispanic children up to the levels of their white and Asian counterparts, the California Department of Education yet again lacked good news to report.


Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

In the News: Keeping a closer eye on students

Students skipping class or receiving bad grades will soon find it harder to keep their wayward ways from their parents.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

Friday, August 14, 2009

In the News: Carlos Garcia makes students excited to learn

Carlos Garcia is gearing up for Aug. 24, the start of the school year. But the superintendent of the San Francisco Unified School District wasn’t always so eager to return to the classroom.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

Thursday, August 6, 2009

In the News: Guest Editorial - Social justice and the achievement gap

Marthaa Torres is an administrator in the San Francisco Unified School District. She is also an adjunct instructor at the University of San Francisco’s School of Education, where she teaches a graduate course in methods for math and science teachers. In this editorial, she expresses that there is no “silver bullet” for closing the achievement gap, but there are critical steps we can take to move us in the right direction.

Watch on NBC 11 ...

In the News: School districts may sue state over budget cuts

California's public school districts may be forced to file a class-action lawsuit against the state to ensure adequate funding in the wake of severe state budget cuts, San Francisco's schools superintendent said Tuesday.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

In the News: S.F. school district's property portfolio

In San Francisco, where a nothing-special square foot of dirt can carry a price tag of $200, the city's school district is sitting on a gold mine.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

In the News: S.F. schools chip in to help interns get paid

For more than a decade, San Francisco high school students have hit the job market each summer through a district internship program that strives to help the teens find their future in law, medicine, construction or other industries. But this year, the recession has made it tough.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

Friday, July 24, 2009

In the News: California schools face $12B in cuts

Education spending will be hurt by California's new budget as school funding is being cut by more than $12 billion over two years. Cutting that much money will no doubt affect what happens inside California classrooms.

Read more from KGO ABC 7 ...

In the News: School-related tax for ballot kept alive

A $150 parcel tax that would support public schools moved toward placement on the November ballot.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner...

Tuesday, July 21, 2009

In the News: Online courses help students stay on track

Galileo high school administrators were frustrated. Year after year, they saw four-year colleges slip through the hands of students who had good grades save for a couple of D's.

While students who failed classes were able to repeat them and have the grade changed, often through summer school or night school, students who had D's were out of luck. The near-failing grade was one that would be stuck on their transcripts forever.

Cyber High changed that. Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle...

In the News: School changes set back a year

Plans to change San Francisco’s controversial public school assignment process have been postponed for at least another year.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

Tuesday, July 7, 2009

In the News: Lowell principal to be honored at Giants game

Andrew Ishibashi, the principal of San Francisco’s high-ranking Lowell High School will be honored by State Superintendent Jack O’Connell and the California Lottery during Tuesday’s Giants game.

Read more in the San Francisco Examiner ...

Thursday, July 2, 2009

In the News: Greening the District by the Bay


The San Francisco Unified School District (SDUSD), like the city itself, has a history of concern for the environment. Since the 1980s, the district’s curriculum has included visits to the Environmental Science Center where kindergartners through fifth graders study ecosystem interdependence, rocks and minerals, or water and energy conservation in Fort Funston’s seaside marine and sand dune habitat.

Read more from Green Technology Magazine…

In the News: Principal says goodbye to 'Bal'

Balboa High School Principal Patricia Gray wasn't sure she wanted a promotion up and out of the school she ran for a decade.

Balboa, or "Bal" as she calls it, had been her baby. Over the last 10 years, the school went from one of the worst in the state to above average in California test scores. It went from a school of last resort to a top pick among incoming freshmen.

Read more in the San Francisco Chronicle ...

Tuesday, June 30, 2009

SFUSD Appoints New Leader for Instruction, Innovation and Social Justice




SFUSD Superintendent Carlos Garcia and the Board of Education announce that Richard Carranza will serve as the new Deputy Superintendent for Instruction, Innovation and Social Justice.


Read more...